Seed Oils

Seed Oils

VOM FASS seed oils are extracted from the seeds of some of nature's finest plants and flowers. These oils are packed with unsaturated fatty, oleic and linoleic acids, trace elements, and vitamins that contribute to the foundation of an active, healthy lifestyle. FassZination Pumpkin Seed Oil is so uniquely flavorful, it is a popular custom among staff and customers to enjoy drizzled over ice-cream or even your favorite local cheese. Our sunflower seed and organic sesame oils are indispensable for high heat cooking and FassZination Sesame Oil will give your Asian dishes a truly authentic spark!

7 Item(s)

7 Item(s)

Learn more about VOM FASS seed oils below and explore the origination of the plant from which the oil is derived, the oil production, culinary uses, and health benefits.


Styrian Pumpkin Seed Oil


Plant and Oil Production

Pumpkin seed oil originated in North and South America and then spread throughout Europe during the 16th century. Today it is predominately grown in Austria, Slovenia, Hungary, Romania and China. Our Styrian Pumpkin Seed Oil from Austria is officially stamped by the EU with the Protected Geographic Indication which is designed to promote and protect names of quality agricultural products and foodstuffs. This essentially means that the pumpkin seeds used for Styrian pumpkin seed oil must come from specifically indicated regions and may only be pressed in Styria.


The oil of pumpkin seed is obtained from pressing the ground and roasted seeds. Cold-pressed oil has a green color and is not widely available so VOM FASS is proud to offer this treasured oil.


Culinary Uses


Pumpkin seed oil should ideally only be used for the preparation of cold dishes that benefit from a deliciously strong nutty smell and flavor. This oil is spectacular for dressing salads or flavoring starches such as rice, cereals, and oats. Boiled potatoes with herbs and pumpkin seed oil are a true delicacy!


Health and Cosmetics


Pumpkin seed oil can be used as a carrier oil and in creams used for dry and cracking skin. In naturopathy, it has been found to be beneficial for urinary tract infections, problems with the vertebral discs, as well as for cystitis and other disorders of the bladder.


Sesame Seed Oil


Plant and Oil Production


Sesame is one of the oldest seed oils. It is a flowering plant that is similar to rape seed. It originated in East Africa and India but today the plant is grown in Turkey, India, China and Egypt. Sesame oil is made from the hulled, conditioned and flaked seeds by pressing or extraction. In some countries the seeds are roasted before pressing. Cold-pressed sesame oil is golden yellow in color, has a slightly nutty smell and a mild flavor. Extracted sesame oil is pale yellow and has no distinctive smell or taste. The oil from roasted seeds is golden brown and has a more intensive nutty flavor.


Culinary Uses


Sesame oil is often used in the food industry to make margarine and is also very popular in the baking industry. The cold-pressed oils go well on a variety salads and vegetables but is particularly well-suited for cooking and frying Asian dishes. Sesame oil can also be used simply as a seasoning on a wide range of foods from meats to starches.


Health and Cosmetics


Pure sesame oil may be beneficial for dry to normal skin. It is often used to prevent stretch marks, as baby oil or to massage scars. It is widely used in Ayurvedic medicine and is traditionally considered a nerve tonic in India.


Grape Seed Oil


Plant and Oil Production


Vineyards are some of the oldest crops of the world. Grapes are used to produce wine and juice with the seeds remaining as a by-product. The seeds are cleaned, dried and ground. The oil is mostly pressed and hardly ever extracted from these seeds. Depending on the type of grape, the color of cold-pressed oil is can vary between yellow to green. It has a bitter-sweet flavor and a nutty grape smell. The extracted and refined oil has a somewhat pale color and a rather neutral taste and smell.


Culinary Uses


Grape seed oil can be used for cold dishes. The refined oil can also be used for steaming and frying other dishes but cold-pressed grape seed oil should only be heated slightly.


Health and Cosmetics


The grape seed oil is quickly absorbed into the skin and is therefore well suited for dry and aging skins; both as a massage or a base oil. In naturopathy, grape seed oil is used in cases of cardiovascular issues.


Sunflower Oil


The Plant


The sunflower plant Helianthus annuuswas was first cultivated and domesticated by the Native Americans in present-day Arizona and New Mexico around 3000 BC. Although native to North America, the sunflower was commercialized in Russia, spread in popularity throughout Europe and only recently became a cultivated crop once again in the U.S., most extensively in the 1970's, in order to satisfy the growing demand.


Oil Production


Native Americans used the oil from sunflowers for making bread, topically on the body and hair, and also medicinally for snakebites and in other ointments. Although much later in history, it was the Europeans who patented the squeezing of the oil from the seed and popularized its usage in the kitchen.


The oil of the sunflower is made from the mature seeds. The husk is removed and the oil is produced either by cold-pressing or by extraction.


Culinary Uses


Within the food industry, sunflower oil is often used for the production of margarine, salad dressings and mayonnaise. Refined sunflower oil is commonly used for low to extremely high temperature frying of most any type of food. Cold-pressed sunflower oil should only be heated slightly in cooking and sautéing. Sunflower oil is also a natural preservative as it helps to keep foods fresher and healthier for a longer period of time.


Health & Cosmetics


Sunflower oil is particularly beneficial as an emollient in lotions to moisturize and hydrate skin and has the advantage of possessing a long shelf life. In naturopathy, it is used for joint diseases, kidneys problems and for cases of poor blood circulation.